Alprazolam - Fairview Health Services
 
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Alprazolam Oral disintegrating tablet

What is this medicine?

ALPRAZOLAM (al PRAY zoe lam) is a benzodiazepine. It is used to treat anxiety and panic attacks.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • an alcohol or drug abuse problem

  • bipolar disorder, depression, psychosis or other mental health conditions

  • glaucoma

  • kidney or liver disease

  • lung or breathing disease

  • myasthenia gravis

  • Parkinson's disease

  • porphyria

  • seizures or a history of seizures

  • suicidal thoughts

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to alprazolam, other benzodiazepines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

These tablets are made to dissolve in the mouth. Just before taking the tablet, remove the tablet from the bottle with dry hands. Place the tablet on the top of the tongue and allow it to dissolve, then swallow. You may take these tablets with water, but it is not necessary to do so. If only one-half of the tablet is used, the unused portion of the tablet should be safely discarded because it may not remain stable. Do not reuse this portion of the tablet. Discard unused tablets in a safe manner away from children and pets.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • ketoconazole

  • itraconazole

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • cimetidine

  • cyclosporine

  • ergotamine

  • female hormones, including contraceptive or birth control pills

  • grapefruit juice

  • herbal or dietary supplements like kava kava, melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA, St. John's Wort or valerian

  • imatinib, STI-571

  • isoniazid

  • levodopa

  • medicines for depression, mental problems or psychiatric disturbances

  • prescription pain medicines

  • rifampin, rifapentine, or rifabutin

  • some antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, troleandomycin

  • some medicines for high blood pressure or heart problems

  • some medicines for HIV infection or AIDS

  • some medicines for seizures like carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Your body can become dependent on this medicine. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you still need to take it. If you have been taking this medicine regularly for some time, do not suddenly stop taking it. You must gradually reduce the dose or you may get severe side effects. Ask your doctor or health care professional for advice. Even after you stop taking this medicine it can still affect your body for several days.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. To reduce the risk of dizzy and fainting spells, do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. Alcohol may increase dizziness and drowsiness. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

Do not treat yourself for coughs, colds or allergies without asking your doctor or health care professional for advice. Some ingredients can increase possible side effects.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • confusion, forgetfulness

  • depression

  • difficulty sleeping

  • difficulty speaking

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • mood changes, excitability or aggressive behavior

  • muscle cramps

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • changes in appetite

  • change in sex drive or performance

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children. This medicine can be abused. Keep your medicine in a safe place to protect it from theft. Do not share this medicine with anyone. Selling or giving away this medicine is dangerous and against the law.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

Alprazolam Oral solution

What is this medicine?

ALPRAZOLAM (al PRAY zoe lam) is a benzodiazepine. It is used to treat anxiety and panic attacks.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • an alcohol or drug abuse problem

  • bipolar disorder, depression, psychosis or other mental health conditions

  • glaucoma

  • kidney or liver disease

  • lung or breathing disease

  • myasthenia gravis

  • Parkinson's disease

  • porphyria

  • seizures or a history of seizures

  • suicidal thoughts

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to alprazolam, other benzodiazepines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Use a specially marked oral syringe or measuring device to measure the dose. Ask your pharmacist if you do not have one. Household spoons are not accurate. If this medicine upsets your stomach, take it with food or milk. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • ketoconazole

  • itraconazole

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • cimetidine

  • cyclosporine

  • ergotamine

  • female hormones, including contraceptive or birth control pills

  • grapefruit juice

  • herbal or dietary supplements like kava kava, melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA, St. John's Wort or valerian

  • imatinib, STI-571

  • isoniazid

  • levodopa

  • medicines for depression, mental problems or psychiatric disturbances

  • prescription pain medicines

  • rifampin, rifapentine, or rifabutin

  • some antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, troleandomycin

  • some medicines for high blood pressure or heart problems

  • some medicines for HIV infection or AIDS

  • some medicines for seizures like carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Your body can become dependent on this medicine. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you still need to take it. If you have been taking this medicine regularly for some time, do not suddenly stop taking it. You must gradually reduce the dose or you may get severe side effects. Ask your doctor or health care professional for advice. Even after you stop taking this medicine it can still affect your body for several days.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. To reduce the risk of dizzy and fainting spells, do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. Alcohol may increase dizziness and drowsiness. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

Do not treat yourself for coughs, colds or allergies without asking your doctor or health care professional for advice. Some ingredients can increase possible side effects.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • confusion, forgetfulness

  • depression

  • difficulty sleeping

  • difficulty speaking

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • mood changes, excitability or aggressive behavior

  • muscle cramps

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • changes in appetite

  • change in sex drive or performance

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children. This medicine can be abused. Keep your medicine in a safe place to protect it from theft. Do not share this medicine with anyone. Selling or giving away this medicine is dangerous and against the law.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

Alprazolam Oral tablet

What is this medicine?

ALPRAZOLAM (al PRAY zoe lam) is a benzodiazepine. It is used to treat anxiety and panic attacks.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • an alcohol or drug abuse problem

  • bipolar disorder, depression, psychosis or other mental health conditions

  • glaucoma

  • kidney or liver disease

  • lung or breathing disease

  • myasthenia gravis

  • Parkinson's disease

  • porphyria

  • seizures or a history of seizures

  • suicidal thoughts

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to alprazolam, other benzodiazepines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed. If you have been taking this medicine regularly for some time, do not suddenly stop taking it. You must gradually reduce the dose or you may get severe side effects. Ask your doctor or health care professional for advice. Even after you stop taking this medicine it can still affect your body for several days.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • certain medicines for HIV infection or AIDS

  • ketoconazole

  • itraconazole

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • birth control pills

  • certain macrolide antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, troleandomycin

  • cimetidine

  • cyclosporine

  • ergotamine

  • grapefruit juice

  • herbal or dietary supplements like kava kava, melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA, St. John's Wort or valerian

  • imatinib, STI-571

  • isoniazid

  • levodopa

  • medicines for depression, anxiety, or psychotic disturbances

  • prescription pain medicines

  • rifampin, rifapentine, or rifabutin

  • some medicines for blood pressure or heart problems

  • some medicines for seizures like carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Your body can become dependent on this medicine. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you still need to take it.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. To reduce the risk of dizzy and fainting spells, do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. Alcohol may increase dizziness and drowsiness. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

Do not treat yourself for coughs, colds or allergies without asking your doctor or health care professional for advice. Some ingredients can increase possible side effects.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • confusion, forgetfulness

  • depression

  • difficulty sleeping

  • difficulty speaking

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • mood changes, excitability or aggressive behavior

  • muscle cramps

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • change in sex drive or performance

  • changes in appetite

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children. This medicine can be abused. Keep your medicine in a safe place to protect it from theft. Do not share this medicine with anyone. Selling or giving away this medicine is dangerous and against the law.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

Alprazolam Oral tablet, extended-release

What is this medicine?

ALPRAZOLAM (al PRAY zoe lam) is a benzodiazepine. It is used to treat anxiety and panic attacks.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • an alcohol or drug abuse problem

  • bipolar disorder, depression, psychosis or other mental health conditions

  • glaucoma

  • kidney or liver disease

  • lung or breathing disease

  • myasthenia gravis

  • Parkinson's disease

  • porphyria

  • seizures or a history of seizures

  • suicidal thoughts

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to alprazolam, other benzodiazepines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Do not cut, crush, chew or divide the tablets. Swallow the tablets whole with a drink of water. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • ketoconazole

  • itraconazole

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • cimetidine

  • cyclosporine

  • ergotamine

  • female hormones, including contraceptive or birth control pills

  • grapefruit juice

  • herbal or dietary supplements like kava kava, melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA, St. John's Wort or valerian

  • imatinib, STI-571

  • isoniazid

  • levodopa

  • medicines for depression, mental problems or psychiatric disturbances

  • prescription pain medicines

  • rifampin, rifapentine, or rifabutin

  • some antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, troleandomycin

  • some medicines for high blood pressure or heart problems

  • some medicines for HIV infection or AIDS

  • some medicines for seizures like carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Your body can become dependent on this medicine. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you still need to take it. If you have been taking this medicine regularly for some time, do not suddenly stop taking it. You must gradually reduce the dose or you may get severe side effects. Ask your doctor or health care professional for advice. Even after you stop taking this medicine it can still affect your body for several days.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. To reduce the risk of dizzy and fainting spells, do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. Alcohol may increase dizziness and drowsiness. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

Do not treat yourself for coughs, colds or allergies without asking your doctor or health care professional for advice. Some ingredients can increase possible side effects.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • confusion, forgetfulness

  • depression

  • difficulty sleeping

  • difficulty speaking

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • mood changes, excitability or aggressive behavior

  • muscle cramps

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • change in sex drive or performance

  • changes in appetite

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children. This medicine can be abused. Keep your medicine in a safe place to protect it from theft. Do not share this medicine with anyone. Selling or giving away this medicine is dangerous and against the law.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

 

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